Browsing 2010 - 2019 by Subject "Employment"

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Browsing 2010 - 2019 by Subject "Employment"

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  • Branson, Nicola; Ardington, Cally; Lam, David; Leibbrandt, Murray (2013-08)
    Rapid increases in educational attainment and the massification of secondary education in South Africa resulted in substantial differences in the supply and quality of educated workers across generations. This paper describes ...
  • Peters, Amos C; Sundaram, Asha (2014-11)
    We study the relationship between country of origin and employment prospects for immigrants to South Africa, an emerging host country characterized by high levels of unemployment, labour market imperfections and a scarcity ...
  • Branson, Nicola; Garlick, Julia; Lam, David; Leibbrandt, Murray (Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, 2012)
    Following the international literature, income inequality decompositions on data from contemporary South Africa show that the labour market is the key driver of overall household inequality. In order to understand one of ...
  • Kahn, Amy; Branson, Nicola; Leibbrandt, Murray (2019-09)
    While there are 11 official languages in South Africa, English remains the dominant language in the country’s economic and political sphere. Internationally, there is a large body of research providing evidence that ...
  • Ardington, Cally; Barnighausen, Till; Case, Anne; Menendez, Alicia (2013-06)
    An Apartheid-driven spatial mismatch between workers and jobs leads to high job search costs for people living in rural areas of South Africa—costs that many young people cannot pay. In this paper, we examine whether the ...
  • Abel, Martin; Burger, Rulof; Piraino, Patrizio (2017-07)
    We show that reference letters from former employers alleviate information asymmetries about workers’ skills and improve both match quality and equity in the labor market. A resume audit study finds that using a reference ...
  • Wittenberg, Martin (Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, 2011-09)
    We show that body mass increases with economics resources among most South Africans, although not all. Among Black South Africans the relationship is non-decreasing over virtually the entire range of incomes/wealth. ...

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