In-Work Poverty in South Africa: The Impact of Income Sharing in the Presence of High Unemployment

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dc.contributor.author Lilenstein, Kezia
dc.contributor.author Woolard, Ingrid
dc.contributor.author Leibbrandt, Murray
dc.date.accessioned 2016-10-27T14:08:40Z
dc.date.available 2016-10-27T14:08:40Z
dc.date.issued 2016-10
dc.identifier.citation Lilenstein, K., Woolard, I., Leibbrandt, M. (2016). In-Work Poverty in South Africa: The Impact of Income Sharing in the Presence of High Unemployment. A Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit Working Paper Number 193. Cape Town: SALDRU, University of Cape Town
dc.identifier.isbn 978-1-928281-54-2
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11090/852
dc.description This is a draft chapter/article that has been accepted for publication by Edward Elgar Publishing in the forthcoming book Handbook of Research on In-Work Poverty, edited by Ive Marx and Henning Lohmann due to be published in 2017. en_US
dc.description.abstract South Africa is distinguished from other countries by its history of Apartheid, in which race-based policies resulted in vastly inferior education and labour market opportunities for African, Coloured and Asian/Indian individuals. This resulted in exceptionally high levels of poverty and inequality constructed along racial lines at the time of the transition to democracy in 1994, motivating the newly elected democratic government to make poverty alleviation a key focus of economic policy. The new political regime faced the major challenge of reforming government institutions which had historically been systematic in underproviding resources to the majority of the population. While the economic, political and social systems have undergone considerable change in the past two decades, the structural effects of colonialism and Apartheid are not easily undone. South Africa remains one of the most unequal societies in the world, resulting in persistently high levels of poverty in what is today an upper-middle income country. Using the lower bound cost of basic needs poverty line developed by Hoogeveen and Ozler (2006), the poverty headcount ratio was relatively unchanged between 1993 and 2010, falling from 56% to 54% over the period (Leibbrandt et al., 2010). en_US
dc.language.iso en en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries Saldru Working Papers;193
dc.title In-Work Poverty in South Africa: The Impact of Income Sharing in the Presence of High Unemployment en_US
dc.type Working Paper en_US


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