Inheriting the Future: Intergenerational Persistence of Educational status in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

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dc.contributor.author Burns, Justine en_US
dc.contributor.author Keswell, Malcolm en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-02-28T13:39:51Z
dc.date.available 2013-02-28T13:39:51Z
dc.date.issued 2011 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11090/164
dc.description.abstract This paper examines the changes in the educational attainment of three successive generations in South Africa: grandparents, parents and children. Many of the results accord with widely known facts, such as the educational penalty faced by individuals who are African or who live in rural areas or in female-headed households. Similarly, the larger impact of mothers education on child outcomes relative to fathers education accords with previous work, although it is interesting that this gender difference is only sizeable and significant for relationships between the second and third generation. Key findings in this paper include the fact that persistence has increased with subsequent generations. en_US
dc.publisher Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit en_US
dc.title Inheriting the Future: Intergenerational Persistence of Educational status in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa en_US


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